Post Fast Reflections

August 12, 2011 at 9:10 am | Posted in adamahniks, food, judaism | Leave a comment

This week we observed Tisha B’Av, a traditional fast day that commemorates the destruction of both the First Temple and the Second Temple in Jerusalem. In addition to thinking about the loss of the temple, we focused on other forms of collective loss we experience both as a Jewish people and as creatures on this planet.

The fast lasts about 25 hours, beginning at sunset on the eve of Tisha B’Av (this past Monday night) and ending at nightfall the next day. In addition to the prohibitions against eating or drinking, I also observed prohibitions against showering, applying creams or oils, wearing leather shoes, and engaging in sexual activity. Though I have never observed Tisha B’Av before, I have always found fasting on Yom Kippur to be a meaningful experience. As we are all learning at Adamah, food (and its absence) physically, emotionally, and spiritually connects us to each other and to the natural world, cultivating a profound sense of oneness and holiness.

All summer long, I have been savoring the food I have grown and eaten here, from my favorite Isabella Freedman dining hall meal (spanikopita made with our own kale!) to the Shabbat meal I cooked this past Shabbat with four other Adamahniks (yakisoba, sushi, and tempura with beets, carrots, onions, and squash from our field!). So I didn’t imagine it would be possible to appreciate the food even more after the fast, but I am.

Submitted by Rachel Ackoff, Summer 2011

Advertisements

Leave a Comment »

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

%d bloggers like this: