West Hartford CSA Delivery July 3rd

July 3, 2014 at 3:30 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Harvest Notes July 3rd 2014

jeremeyandthepeas1

Cucumber Just in time to cool us all off in this very hot weather! These thin skinned, small-seeded cucumbers are a Persian variety. You may notice some beatle scars on the skin that are purely cosmetic.

Zucchini When it rains zucchini it pours zucchini and we expect to be in a deluge this summer! The zucchini plants are popping out scores of yellow, dark green, and light green fruits so you will have an opportunity to try each kind throughout the season. They taste quite similar to one another.

Broccoli You may not be used to seeing broccoli with so much stem and leaves still on the head but every bit of it is delicious! Adamah staff member Sarah Chandler’s favorite vegetable is broccoli leaves which she cooks up just like kale.

Kohlrabi It may look like an alien but it is delicious! The white fleshed bulb can be peeled of its purple skin and it tastes and crunches a lot like a sweet, juicy broccoli stem. You can roast it, sautee it, or eat it raw. Kohlrabi tends to be a big hit with kids when sliced like carrot sticks. The leaves store about as well as kale does (and taste very similar) but the kohlrabi itself will last for months in the crisper of your fridge.

Garlic Scapes Garlic plants send up a flower stalk (the scape) about a month before the bulbs are ready for harvest. We remove the scape so that the plant will put more energy into making a beautiful big bulb. Conveniently, the scape happens to be delicious. It can be used in place of garlic in any recipe, sauteed like a garlicky green bean, made into scape pesto, or waved around in the air and gummed by teething babies.

Sugar Snap Peas The whole thing is edible- both pea and pod! If you don’t devour these sweet snacks on the car ride home, they can make a crunchy addition to salads or stir-fries. You will want to remove the string from the back of the pod before cooking.

Snow Peas These peas are flatter than the sugar snaps and don’t pack quite as sweet a punch. They are commonly used in stir-fries but are delicious raw as well. You can eat both the peas and the pods! If you don’t use them all this week they can be frozen.

Lettuce Heads Both of the lettuces this week have got a lot of crunch and beauty to them. The green head is a true romaine while the red head is called a summer crisp.

Salad Mix This is the last week of salad mix until the fall. Salad greens tend to get bitter as the temperatures heat up so we can’t keep the plantings going all summer. We’ll just have to savor them and make room in our fridges for the incoming summer harvests!

Lavendar These flowers are great for baking or as arromatic ornamentals. If you want to eat it, you can check out the lavendar cookie recipe on the Jewish Local Greens blog or consider grinding it up and sprinkling it on popcorn. If you want to look at it and smell it for a week or so, strip the bottom leaves off and put it in a vase of water. If you want to enjoy it dried for years to come, hang the bunch upside down in a well ventilated space for a few weeks until it is completely dry.

Storage Guide for This Week’s Share

CROP

SHORT STORAGE LIFE

(eat first)

MED STORAGE LIFE

(1-2 weeks)

LONG STORAGE LIFE

(2 or more wks)

STORE IN FRIDGE IN BAG

STORE ON COUNTER

FREEZES WELL

DRIES WELL

Cucumber

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Zucchini

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Broccoli

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Kohlrabi

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Kohlrabi Greens

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Garlic Scapes

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Peas

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Lettuce

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Salad Mix

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Lavender

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