West Hartford CSA Pickup – August 7th

August 9, 2014 at 6:27 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

State of the Farm

August 2014 – Adamah – Falls Village, CT

     Eating seasonally means leafy green salads in June and cucumber-tomato salads in August. It means keeping up with zucchini in its time and loading up on hearty roots like potatoes as the weather cools. In addition to the fairly predictable variation month-to-month, seasonal eating also brings fluctuation year to year. Some years the produce just seems to offer itself prolifically out of the ground while other years hail mashes it to smithereens or excessive rain soaks the roots for weeks on end.

     This season we are overwhelmed with gorgeous produce. CSA shares have been valuing close to $40 each week and, correspondingly, all of our bodies are brimming with vitamins, minerals, and anti-oxidants. Our palates and bellies are satiated not to mention our noses and eyes from the the aromatic, colorful bounty. Even though we had a late spring and a few funny rain patterns our crops have held strong and thrived.

     Barring any unexpected apocalyptic weather events, the outlook for fall produce is fantastic. We should have plenty of roots and greens to keep up the abundance that this season has brought us thus far!

garlictruck

 

Harvest Notes August 7th 2014

Cucumber I’ve been eating simple cucumber salads ever since the heat of summer took out the lettuce and salad mix. I just slice up lots of cucumbers and eat them with salad dressing.

Summer Squash Running out of ideas for summer squash? Try shredding it for raw salads, making fritters, baking it with cheese, stuffing it with rice, or vinegar pickling them. There is always one more idea out there for zucchini so stay strong for last couple weeks of zucchini season and keep googling recipes!

Carrots These sweeties work well in raw salads with cucumber and tomato, munched just as they are, or cooked. They will store for a long time in your fridge in a bag.

Leeks These onion relatives lend a particular creaminess and flavor to lots of dishes. I love to slow cook leeks for a long time before adding them to soups, casseroles, pasta, pizza, or a slice of toast. The smell will fill your kitchen! Leeks grow layer by layer so you may need to slice off the bottom and then cut the leek lengthwise in half when washing to get all of the dirt out.

Fresh Garlic This garlic is still not fully cured so you will notice that it has thick skin. You should still peel that skin off before use. Refrigerate this fresh garlic and use it within a couple weeks.

Eggplant This week you get to choose from Japanese eggplant (the long, skinny variety) or a small Italian variety called Diamond. You can mix and match or get all of one kind. Both varieties can be used fairly interchangeably although the Japanese eggplant have slightly thinner skins.

Green Beans If you’ve never tried dry frying green beans in a Chinese Sichuan style, I highly recommend looking up a recipe. The concept is that you char them a bit before adding oil and it really brings out the green bean flavor.

Thai Basil This basil has a unique flavor and purple color. Just like Italian basil, Thai basil is still a good match for tomatoes and garlic. It is also common in curries.

Tomato We grow many different kinds of heirloom tomatoes so you get to choose from a range of colors each week. The darker tomatoes have a deeper flavor while the orange ones are more acidic. Tomatoes are fully ripe and ready to eat when they are soft to the touch. Leave them on the counter rather than in the fridge until they are fully ripe and then eat them within a few days. Refrigerated tomatoes lose their flavor.

Storage Guide for This Week’s Share

CROP

SHORT STORAGE LIFE

(eat first)

MED STORAGE LIFE

(1-2 weeks)

LONG STORAGE LIFE

(2 or more wks)

STORE IN FRIDGE IN BAG

STORE ON COUNTER

FREEZES WELL

DRIES WELL

Cucumber

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Squash

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Carrots

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Leeks

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Garlic

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Eggplant

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Green Beans

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Basil

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Tomato

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